Posts Tagged "Unix"

A nuclear mushroom cloud

Why Apple should acquire Nokia

Making the case for Apple acquiring Nokia.

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The war for developers

Why developers matter in understanding the next wave of mobile computing.

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Apple

Facetime: an industry standard – when?

Apple promised to release Facetime as a standard. We’re still waiting.

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Fighting Hacking 2.0

People, not algorithms, are the best way to fight hacking. Here’s Why.

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Apple

Apple moves to Intel

Apple finally makes its move to Intel processors

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Usability 101: Memorability

Having covered learnability and efficiency as the first two elements of usability, it is now time to turn to memorability. What is memorability? The concept of memorability, within the usability context, is that a user can leave a program and, when he or she returns to it, remember how to do things in it. How many times have we all gone through a training exercise with someone who knew the system only to come back to it and be completely confused? This is the issue that memorability tries to address. Why is memorability important? Memorability is important largely because users may not be using your application all the time. In some cases, they might get some training on it, then go off on vacation, then come back and be too swamped with other things to use your piece of software. There are a variety of reasons for which a user may not be using a piece of software for an extended period of time. When they come back to it, though, you need to make sure that they remember how to use it. In some ways, memorability can be tied to learnability in that it works in the dark recesses…

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Seeing Red

Last week, for the second week in a row, IIS administrators have had to face Code Red. More than a simple virus, Code Red could represent a new acceleration in the online virus war and shows that we may not be ready, as an industry, for the era of web services. A Rapid Epidemic Now that I’ve got your attention, let’s take a quick look at how Code Red spread. First of all, there was a simple buffer overflow problem in Microsoft Index Server, for which the company produced a patch. A month later, Code Red starting showing up. However, its rate of growth was relatively slow at the beginning. The true epidemic did not start until July 19th, when Code Red exploded onto the scene, increasing the number of infected servers from just around 300 at 00:15am to 2994 by 7:30am, over 30,000 by 14:40pm and over 300,000 in the 6 hours after that. In other words, in less than a day, Code Red went from a relatively small annoyance to a full blown attack on the net infrastructure. Had no one rung the bell on it, it would have taken only a couple of days for it to…

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Going wireless with the Palm V

For the past few weeks, I’ve been experimenting with OmniSky’s new wireless service for the Palm V and I have to admit that it has affected my wireless usage. Running over AT&T’s CDPD network, the service allows Palm V users to get full access to the net at speeds of up to 19.2kbps. Priced at $300 for the modem and a $40 monthly rate for unlimited access, the service is still not cheap but it is starting to approach the reasonable area once you realize how much you can do with it. The basic software package comes with some of the same clips that are available on the Palm VII and a few extra programs like a full mail package which allows you to connect to your POP3 server. However, I decided to get rid of that piece of software once I discovered Ptelnet, a small telnet client for the palm. This allows me to access a Unix server on which I not only have an email client but also a Usenet client, as well as a web browser (lynx) and an FTP client. As a result, this telnet client works as the perfect on the road kit. For more…

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1994-2000: How Things Have Changed

Looking at the things that changed on the Internet between 1994 and 2000.

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